Get your kids thinking green this summer

Editor, The News:

Going Green is a great activity to begin during the summer months with you child.

You can make the decision to start small or make the commitment to change your lifestyle.

Here are some suggestions:

1. Plant a tree. So much of our treasured wildlife is losing their homes due to deforestation.

2. Plant a vegetable garden and share your abundant wealth of vegetables with your neighbors.

3. Help your child write letters of concern that involve preserving our environment to local legislatures.

4. Start bringing your own grocery bags to the market. Vermont charges customers for the plastic bags taken from the market. They are on the right track.

5. Visit Fair Trade stores with your child. Show them how purchasing gifts from these stores will help other families around the world to put food on their table. (The Silk Road in New Wilmington)

6. Visit a recycling plant.

Here are some of my favorite books about Going Green:

1. “Grow Happy” by Jon Lasser, PhD, and Sage Foster-Lasser

2. “Errol’s Garden” by Gillian Hibbs

3. “Green Green: A Community Gardening Story” by Marie Lamba and Baldev Lamba

4. “Designing Green Communities: Design Thinking for a Better World” by Janic Dyer

5. “Sheila Says We’re Weird (but we’re just green)” by Ruth Ann Smalley

6. “My Busy Green Garden” by Terry Pierce

7. “Grandpa Cacao: A Tale of Chocolate, From Farm to Family” by Elizabeth Zunon

Help to teach your child/family to go green this summer.

Todd Cole

New Castle

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