New Castle News

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December 19, 2013

State House votes to cut 62 seats

HARRISBURG — Pennsylvania lawmakers are moving to thin their ranks, potentially reducing the size of the second-largest state Legislature in the country.

The state House voted Tuesday to reduce the overall number of lawmakers in Harrisburg from 253 to 191 by eliminating 50 seats in the House and a dozen in the Senate.

The House has passed similar legislation before, only to have it die in the Senate. Republicans control both chambers, but the House tends to be more ideologically driven.

House Speaker Sam Smith, who said the plan will make the Legislature more efficient, has split the effort into two bills, one targeting the House and one the Senate. That way, even if there isn’t support in the Senate to eliminate seats there, the House reduction could still fly.

Under the plan, the state’s legislative maps would be redrawn under the same process used every decade.

In this case, the state would be divided into 153 House districts representing 83,421 people, rather than the current 63,000.

Cutting Senate seats to 38 would increase size of Senate districts to about 335,000 people from the current 225,000.

But a large-scale redistricting concerns Democrats. The current process is led by a five-member panel made up of the party leaders in each chamber, plus one other commissioner.

Democrats tried to get an amendment passed to shift control of redrawing the legislative map to an independent, non-partisan group. That effort would have eliminated concerns about gerrymandering, said Rep. Bryan Barbin, D-Cambria County.

Barbin said Pennsylvania historically has had a large Legislature because 19th Century reformers thought more lawmakers would make it difficult for railroad titans to control the body. Barbin said he doesn’t think there’s any harm in getting rid of 50 seats in the House.

But other Democrats, including Rep. Greg Vitali, D-Delaware County, who opposed the reduction on Tuesday, said the same concerns from the 19th Century remain valid. Fewer lawmakers make it easier for special interest groups to hold sway.

State Rep. Chris Sainato, Lawrence County, agreed. “This is not about good government, it’s about power.”

One argument Smith raises in support of his plan is that it would improve efficiency within the chambers. It would also reduce cost.

“I can understand why (Smith) likes his plan from an administrative standpoint,” said state Rep. Jaret Gibbons, Lawrence County, who had proposed merging the Senate and House into one chamber. The House rejected Gibbons’ plan in a near party-line vote Monday.

“I still think mine is better,” Gibbons said. Merging the chambers would save $90 million a year, he noted. Reducing the number of lawmakers would only save about $5 million a year.

Any cost-savings might be diminished if lawmakers hire more staff to deal with the larger districts, said Rep. Brad Roae, R-Crawford County.

“Many employers have had to cut back during these hard times. I think it’s only appropriate that we take action to downsize the state Legislature,” Roae said.

“We would have to make sure that the remaining lawmakers do not hire additional staff to avoid the complete erosion of these savings.”

As a proposed Constitutional amendment, the measure must pass the House and Senate in two consecutive sessions. It would then be put before the voters in 2015, at the earliest.

While lawmakers disagreed about the merits of different aspects of the proposal, they agreed on one thing, any effort to reduce the size of the Legislature will resonate with voters.

“I don’t think the people are going to be the problem,” said state Rep. Fred Keller, R-Union County.

Only New Hampshire has more state lawmakers than Pennsylvania. But New Hampshire’s 424 lawmakers work part time and are paid $200 a year. State lawmakers in Pennsylvania are paid a base salary of $83,801 a year.



How’d they vote?

HB 1234 — Reducing size of state House from 203 to 153 passed 148-50, with four non-voting and one vacancy.

HB 1716 — Reducing the size of the state Senate from 50 to 38 passed 150-48, with four non-voting.

Lawmakers representing Lawrence County cast the same votes on both measures.

Jaret Gibbons, Democrat —Yes

Chris Sainato, Democrat — No

Michele Brooks, Republican — No.

 

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