New Castle News

Letters to the Editor

December 6, 2013

Promotion of Obamacare was product of deception

NEW CASTLE — Editor, The News:

Let us not totally focus on the over $634 million Obamacare website, which was created by a Canadian company (CGI).

Curiously, an executive of CGI happens to be Michelle Obama’s college friend. Contractors shouldn’t bear all the blame. The Obama administration, for political reasons, had its hands in sabotaging the website’s success.

The administration, not wanting huge rate increases per state to be exposed and wanting to hide the true “unaffordable” cost of Obamacare, ordered the “browsing feature” not be activated. Demanding all visitors to healthcare.gov to input all personal information (causing traffic jams and website crashes) was to try to reduce sticker shock. The browsing feature was added in late October, but often provides incorrect pricing.

The real focus should be on the massive fraud, deception and lies used to promote Obamacare. Promises about Obamacare have proven to be untrue. Sept. 29, 2010, all Senate Democrats voted against removing the now infamous “grandfather clause,” which made illegal any policy that changes one iota, did not meet Obamacare created standards, or was issued after passage of Obamacare (even it if did meet Obamacare standards).

With Sen. Mike Enzi’s presentation of a joint resolution to express congressional disapproval and to eliminate the “grandfather clause” to protect people from losing their health care plans, every Democrat voted nay. It makes every statement made by Democrats of, “If you like your health care plan, you can keep your health care plan,” an outright lie. Period.

While everyone’s hung up on the monumental failure of the website, let’s not forget the economic disaster within the 20,000 pages of regulations, measuring seven feet, three inches and containing nearly 12 million words.

Patty Jenkins

Albert Street

New Castle

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