New Castle News

Letters to the Editor

December 13, 2013

Government spending aids public in meaningful ways

NEW CASTLE — Editor, The News:

When I read the letter to the editor written by Sherina Tiberia, where she attempted to refute my favorable appraisal of government, I decided not to reply to her letter since, in my opinion, she misunderstood the point I was making.

But now that Paul Stefano has resurrected the affair by his letter published recently, I hereby answer Tiberia as follows:

She cited charitable programs of the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s in support of her claim while, according to Stefano, “portraying contemporary programs as failures.”

To respond to that is an easy task. I will overlook the federal government’s annual expenditure of billions of dollars on programs (all to the benefit of the citizens) such as the military, national security, food and drug, roads and bridges, aid to states, agriculture, transportation, intelligence, etc., etc., etc., and restrict myself to health and human services.

In a report issued by the Institute for Health Freedom dated Oct. 31, the following appears with regard to medical education and training in colleges and hospitals: “In 1927, student fees accounted for 34 percent of medical school revenues. Today less than 5 percent of medical school revenues comes from tuition and fees. Instead, medical schools rely heavily on federal and state support.

“In 1992, total medical school revenues amounted to $23 billion. State and local governments provided $2.7 billion. The federal government paid at least $10.3 billion to medical schools and hospitals for medical education and training. Additional revenues were obtained from charges for services, endowments and private grants.”

Learning is a necessary ingredient to progress and realizing that, our government, by means of financial grants, attempts to secure the success for any worthwhile enterprise.

Richard J. Audino

Kings Chapel Road

New Castle

 

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