New Castle News

July 1, 2014

Kali Davies-Anderson: Chips for breakfast? Europe envy? It’s potty time!

Kali Davies-Anderson
New Castle News

NEW CASTLE — Around a year ago, I blogged about starting to potty train my oldest daughter, Violet.

One year, about 3,000 diapers, thousands of tears and tantrums from which I was not exempt and hundreds of dollars later I can now proudly exclaim that I have a (mostly) potty trained toddler.

I never could have imagined that it would take an entire year of trying, taking breaks from trying, success, failure, advancements and setbacks to get a 2-year-old to do something we all do without thinking.

When I was handed my 8 pound, 3 ounce baby girl in September of 2011, I was so ill-prepared.

Sure, I had baby furniture, a spotless nursery, tiny socks and onesies, car seats, strollers and an endless supply of toys, but I knew NOTHING about being a mother.

Some days I still feel that way.

Parenting is all about give and take, patience and figuring it out as you go.

Before I had my daughter, I had tendencies to scoff at parents who had almost 3-year-olds in diapers.

I felt as though I could control how picky of an eater my children would be by simply offering them foods that I ate.

I believed that television was the devil (OK, not the devil but pretty bad).

Almost three years later I laugh (and shake my head in disapproval) at my former self.

I now am the proud parent of an almost 3-year-old who is just now potty trained and a Nick Jr. loving 1-year-old.

Yes, I bribe my children with potato chips at 9 a.m. sometimes. Yes, I have on more than one occasion changed grown man worthy diapers.

I have also lured my children into the house with ring pops, cell phones and on the rare occasion, false promises.

I swear under my breath at least 10 times a day, and call my mom to complain on a regular basis.

Sometimes during the day I am jealous of my friends living in Europe because they are six hours ahead of us and it is bed time there.

Parenting is not easy, but it IS rewarding.

Over the past year I have seen my Violet go from a very stubborn, unyielding, reckless little wild child to a cuddly, loving, conscientious and POTTY TRAINED little sweetie.

Not that there was anything wrong with how she was a year ago; it is just the progression that I enjoy reflecting on.

As a mother I do not strive to raise doctors, geniuses (though they clearly will be) or wealthy entrepreneurs.

My biggest wish as a parent is that I raise children who are patient, kind, strong-willed, determined and responsible.

And I suppose I can only do this if I set the example.

I know that potty training is small potatoes in the grand scheme of things, but it has taught me to keep on keeping on with kids, because they will eventually get it.

Even if it takes a lifetime.

Or in my case, just a year.