New Castle News

Lugene Hudson

September 28, 2013

Culinary Conversation: Region boasts some tasty recipes

NEW CASTLE — New Castle has its hot-dog sauce, lamb on the rod, some darned good pizza and frozen custard — all of which people travel miles for.

Pittsburgh is known for its own set of goodies.

Western Pennsylvania and eastern Ohio, in general, have recipes unheard of in other parts of the country.

It’s a proud area of proud cooks, and justifiably so.

I’m aware of many of the ethnic recipes that have been around for ages, but I learned some things while visiting a website dedicated to recipes from Pittsburgh.

A dish we have somewhat frequently at my house is city chicken. I didn’t know it was considered a Pittsburgh dish until I read some comments. Add to that — it’s not really chicken. It’s a mixture of pork and veal. And how it got that name wasn’t revealed.

Barbecued chipped ham sandwiches always seem to be a hit, especially at tailgate parties. Pittsburgh potatoes sound like a crowd pleaser anytime, and just for extra measure, I threw in recipes for sticky buns and Buckeyes, which although are mainly associated with Ohio, are certainly enjoyed by neighbors to the east.

What are some of your favorite local or regional recipes? Share them with us at Culinary Conversation.

For the record, as I scrolled through all the comments, I noticed yinz was used a lot.

And “Everything is better Pittsburgh-style.”

CITY CHICKEN

  • 1 egg
  • 1⁄4 cup water
  • 1 envelope (about .6 ounce) blue cheese salad dressing mix
  • 6 city chicken (about 11⁄2 pounds of equal parks pork and veal cubes placed on skewers)
  • 1⁄4 cup shortening
  • 1⁄2 to 3⁄4 cup dry bread crumbs
  • 1⁄4 cup shortening
  • 1 teaspoon salt

Beat egg and water slightly; stir in salad dressing mix. Dip meat into egg, then coat with bread crumbs. Melt shortening in large skillet; brown meat quickly. Season with salt and pepper. Reduce heat.

Cover tightly; simmer one hour or until meat is done. Add small amount of water if necessary.

*Can be served with mashed potatoes or noodles and French-style green beans.

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Lugene Hudson
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